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the saudis are providing virtually no assistance today to egypt. think of what is going on in jordan and egypt today. these two countries, each of whom borders the world's most resource-rich, energy-rich part of the world, today, are undergoing a rather draconian restrictions on the uses of energy. the lights are out in cairo every night at 10:00 and jordan has-rations. the live virtually right next door to saudi arabia. who are the three leaders who deserve special attention, mr. president? first, let's start with the prime minister of israel. if he gets another term as prime minister, he will be with you throughout your presidency. locked at the hip or perhaps another part of your anatomy. [laughter] your interests state to state our confidence and complementary. you don't have to love each other but you have to out -- but you have a big agenda with each other, that requires you to work together. it is very important for mr. netanyahu to work together with few. you are the great power and israel is the small power. you have a role to play in building a new relationship with him as
across north africa beginning with egypt, i've asked our speakers to limit the remarks to roughly seven minutes in order to reserve plenty of time for your questions and answers. dr. anthony and the organizers as always have provided with a series of thought-provoking questions, and as with previous panels, question cards we available to you. so first, i'd like to call on karim who is a visiting professor, and served as a great egyptian diplomat with direct experience in egypt's diplomacy towards middle east regional security, arms control and nonproliferation issues. is also a veteran of the egyptian information and political military affairs office here in washington. so it offers a unique insight into the delicate relationship new leaders find themselves maneuvering in. mr. haggag, thank you. >> thank you, and i'd like to thank the council for this opportunity. it's a pleasure to be here with you today. i'd like to focus my remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the conce
. and that's later. and next, egypt's new president makes a power play. [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. >> an eye for an eye, taliban style tops world headlines tonight. a suicide bomber detonated a truck full of explosives today in eastern afghanistan. three afghan civilians were killed and more than 90 people wounded. the taliban says it was retaliation for the recent execution of detainees. pakistan is suspending cell phone service m most parts of the country this weekend to prevent attacks of shiite muslims during a religious observance and militants often used phones for detonate bombs and killed more than a dozen people this week. what some are calli
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>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian stock market plunged 10 percent today. such a dramatic plunge has not been seen since mubarek was over thrown one year ago. >> thank you very much for that live report from cairo. >> it has been nearly two ye
in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
egypt. my opinions in what was happening in the last two years is somewhat in comparison to what was happening in 1978 when i was there. what we are seeing now is that the u.s. has very little to do with what happened there. that the uprisings were very much from within and were very much about the economic devastation that many of the countries have experienced, and it was very much a grassroots movement. that means a signal of hope that this was something from the people themselves and not something imposed on them from outside. now i think we are a little impatient. it has only been two years. these countries have their own unique problems that we will talk about, but i think it has been two years. in the case of libya, it has been over four decades of stagnation. so expectations should be moderated based on the fact that this is a process >> let me just address this by answering the question, why were so many people surprised by the uprising and use that as an understanding of what is actually going on. we weren't actually surprised that the public -- this is something, every
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
continues over the benghazi terror attack. we'll discuss the situation in egypt. the cease-fire in gaza, and the libya investigation when we sit down with senator john mccain. it's a fox news sunday exclusive. then is the looming fiscal cliff casting a shadow over shoppers and investors this holiday season? visions of bargains are dancing in the heads of consumers. will the possibility of higher attackses slow them down. we'll talk with matthew shay, president of the national retail federation and john sweeney of fidelity investments. the holiday is over for white house and congressional leaders trying to make a deal. we'll ask our sunday panel if they can reach a compromise. >>> a thanksgiving tradition, our power player of the week has me dancing with turkeys, all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. on this holiday weekend we're watching several major foreign policy developments from egypt to gaza to the continuing converse over the benghazi attack. to talk about it all is senator john mccain. welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> thank y
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
need to help the libyans train a national army. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: ther
crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked o
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
in egypt and tunisia to push this forward and to overcome the increasing polarization. >> i will add to and dan's remarks and say in terms of technicalities and specific steps that need to be taken to reconfigure the domestic security establishment, they are all laid out there in a study that was put together by a group of civil society leaders as well as a group of meetings from the securities sector, commonly known as police for egypt. there's a great deal of debate within civil society about the exact concrete actionable step that needs to be taken in the short run and in the long run some of these steps when themselves to the type of changes that would require the liberation. this is one issue to keep in mind. the dialog's ideas are out there but what is missing as dan mentioned is the political will, the seriousness to engage in dialogue on this issue, even if they're not ready to adopt policy recommendations, there needs to be some kind of ongoing dialogue on these issues but at the same time i want to point out the issue of political will is important, there will always be a c
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
are scrambling to try to get israel and hamas to take a step back. egypt's prime minister and president arrived in gaza today. a planned cease-fire for the visit never materialized while president mohamed morsi made it clear whose side egypt is on. >> translator: we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us. and the blood that flows from their children is our blood too. >> so most of the west, including the united states sides with israel. a nation now on the brink of staging a ground assault. israel's deputy foreign minister told cnn this morning that would trigger that move. >> if we will see in the next 24, 36 hours more rockets, launched at us, i think that would be the trigger. >> ben wedeman joins me now from the israel/gaza border. what are you seeing and hearing there now? >> reporter: it is a bit surreal here. we're in the city's marina right next to the yoko sushi restaurant. as you can see, there are people out, having dinner. seemingly to be living a normal life. but the owner of this restaurant did tell us just an hour ago they heard t
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
into israel and firing back on twitter, warning israel has "opened the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of the new york times and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the failout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes as well since the killing of ahmed al jabari, the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we are just hearing this from the military spokesperson that they are bringing in reservists, but they are consider iing a ground war, but they have not yet given the go ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from
of government and that our impression is that the presidency, the foreign ministry, the other agencies of egypt have worked together cohesively with in relation to hamas and to israel to try to bring about a ceasefire. so we have to support their efforts. >> dr. julian lewis. >> does the foreign secretary agree that the greater stride towards peace was when president sadat signed the treaty between egypt and israel, and does he, therefore, share my disappointment of the statement recently by president morrissey of -- morsi of egypt that the president situation is an act of aggression solely by the israelis? >> well,hile that statement is different from what he or i might say about the origins of this, nevertheless, i hope my honorable friend will bear in mind the answer i gave to the previous question about the very constructive role being played by egypt. my experience and the prime minister's experience in meeting president morsi is that he wants a peaceful future for his country, he has not turned against the peace treaty with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy an
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
to the far east speaking air force one with leaders from israel and egypt and turkey in a scramble to avoid further escalation of the violence. i welcome israel's counsel general and will israel invade gaza in >> the man date that the israel defense forces receive from the israeli government is remove the threat that is it a magnitude. and thousands of rockets that threaten and paralyze life in our count southerp region. the government gave a man date to remove and thatthis is not limited in time or in scope. it is it certainly a possibility and at this stage of the game we don't know yet. >> gaza is one of the defensest populated places. there will be more civilian casulties and don't worry about international pressure on israel. >> we enjoy legitimacy. the president of the united states expressed support in israel's right to arm itself. but we are concerned about innocent people being harmed because of the military action. and the government instructed it to minimize it as humanly possible the loss of life and damage to proper. >> i know that. and i know that israel always does that. and
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
expect? the people will be poor. >> maybe the position of egypt and today president mohammed morsi said this? >> translator: we are with them, what hurts us and the blood that flows from their children is our blood, too opinion. >> what did you make of that? >> we preferred to look at egyptian deeds rather than words. egypt has played a constructive role in the past in mediating cease-fires with gaza and we hope that the egyptians will continue to fulfill a constructive role in the future. >> you must have been disconcerted by the tone of president morsi's rhetoric there. >> again, we prefer to look at the egyptian deeds and they will play a constructive role in helping convince them to stop firing these thousands of rockets at our civilians. >> is your intention at the same time to continue targeting hamas leaders and to continue, if you can, killing them? >> well, we'll take any measures necessary to stop the aggression against the civilians and we're taking immense precautions not to hurt palestinian civilians. our planes have carried out hundreds of attacks and the number of palesti
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
that the spring is beneficial, we see that in egypt, this is not necessarily the case. the muslim brotherhood in egypt, the sunni islam that party with different views of regional policy. the egyptian president was in tehran recently for the non-aligned movement meeting and there is a lot of worry at him going to tehran would indicate that iran was isolated as the u.s. had imagined it to be or wanted it to be. more see meeting with iran officials indicated iran is an important regional player. of course what did morrissey during undreamed due? he criticized the regime of bashar al-assad and implicitly criticized the regime for his support of syria. this was an embarrassment for the iranian leadership, to the point that they change translation on television. he criticized syria and every man television set by rain. so trying to save face basically. but we've seen that egypt is not necessarily going to follow iran's policies in the region. in fact, the egyptians have kept their distance from tehran. they have not resumed relations in this a lot of tension in some issues. in addition, turkey eme
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fir
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